The Main Thing God Wants You to Do In Light of the 1,000-Year Flood of Texas (Gospel Light Minute X #286)


This is the “chief of sinners,” Daniel Whyte III, president of Gospel Light Society International, reminding you of what the Bible says, that “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” like you and me.

The images coming out of Texas this week have been striking — water levels as high as trees and stop signs, cars and trucks submerged, people riding boats where they used to drive, entire neighborhoods reduced to what look like miniature archipelagos — just the roofs of houses visible above the waterline. So much rain has fallen thanks to Hurricane Harvey that it has set a new record for most rainfall in the continental United States. The flooding in the southern and southeastern part of the state has been unprecedented and the aftermath of the deluge has left over 50 people dead and over 30,000 people displaced.

It is hard for many, especially those who live in America, to imagine their entire community and all of their belongings washed away by a hurricane. Unfortunately, many have lost valuable possessions; for example, reports indicate that nearly a million vehicles will be declared total losses.

Seeing the flooding in my adopted state of Texas, which I love, reminds me of the Great Flood which occurred thousands of years ago. God sent that worldwide flood to not only destroy the earth, but to destroy every living thing — people and animals — except those who were safe with Noah in the ark. God sent the flood then because the people of earth had become exceedingly wicked and violent and God decided to rid the earth of them and start all over with Noah and his family and the animals.

After that flood, the Bible tells us that God put the rainbow in the sky as a sign of His promise that He would never judge the earth again by a worldwide flood. The rainbows we see today are a beautiful reminder of that promise.

However, we should also be reminded of something else from the Word of God — that God still hates sin and that we will still be judged for our actions in this life. The Bible says clearly that the “wages of sin is death” and that “all have sinned.” If you are alive, you are a sinner, and that means that you will one day die. However, death does not have to be the end of the story. God loves you and wants to save you from your sins in this life and from the eternal punishment for sin — separation from Him in a place called Hell. Whether you like it or not, that is the judgment that awaits every person who dies without taking care of their sin problem on this side of eternity.

Very briefly, I want to share with you how you can take care of your sin problem and avoid God’s judgment. Please listen carefully: Continue reading “The Main Thing God Wants You to Do In Light of the 1,000-Year Flood of Texas (Gospel Light Minute X #286)”

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings: “I Am a Christ-driven Human Being” (Gospel Light Minute #217)

Mike Rawlings
Mike Rawlings

He is the 61st mayor of Dallas, Texas and has been mayor since 2011. He is a graduate of Boston College. Before becoming mayor, he was the CEO of Pizza Hut. He was also a chief executive officer of the advertising agency, Tracy-Locke. Since his election, Dallas has seen increased economic growth and a significant drop in unemployment over the years. Along with running the city, he fights to improve public education, combat poverty, is also a prominent opponent of domestic violence, and pushes to elevate the city’s international profile. Recently, he was called a “natural, national leader”, by Black Christian News Network One (BCNN1.com), in light of the strong leadership he provided in the wake of the tragic police killings in Dallas, Texas.

He is a member of First Presbyterian Church in Dallas and said of his faith in an interview with the Dallas Voice, “I am a Christ-driven human being.” Similarly in a 2013 discussion about faith being interjected into public schools, he said, “One of the first big words I learned in Sunday school as a kid was ‘omniscient’. I went on to learn ‘omnipresent’ which led me to think that if God was indeed everywhere, then he is in schools too. Surely we can create a new way to educate, to fund the best and the brightest in this country. For me, it starts with God being omnipresent in lives across this country.”

His name is Mike Rawlings. Continue reading “Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings: “I Am a Christ-driven Human Being” (Gospel Light Minute #217)”

GLMX #251: The Texas Flooding Reminds Us About God’s Judgment

texas-flooding


The images coming out of Texas this week have been striking — water levels as high as trees and stop signs, cars and trucks submerged, people riding boats where they used to drive, entire neighborhoods reduced to what look like miniature archipelagos — just the roofs of houses visible above the waterline. So much rain has fallen in Texas over the past few weeks — 37.3 trillion gallons to be exact — enough to cover the entire state in eight inches of water. The flooding in the southern and southeastern part of the state has been unprecedented and some have compared the deluge to the aftermath of a major hurricane.

It is hard for many, especially those who live in America, to imagine their entire community and all of their belongings washed away by a rainstorm and flooded rivers. Unfortunately, many have lost valuable possessions and some have even lost their lives.

Seeing the flooding in my own home state of Texas reminds me of the Great Flood which occurred thousands of years ago. God sent that worldwide flood to not only destroy the earth, but to destroy every living thing — people and animals — except those who were safe with Noah in the ark. God sent the flood then because the people of earth had become exceedingly wicked and violent and God decided to rid the earth of them and start all over with Noah and his family and the animals. Continue reading “GLMX #251: The Texas Flooding Reminds Us About God’s Judgment”

GLMX #172: The Suddenness of Kennedy’s Death and God’s Salvation

It was the perfect day.

The leader of the free world — vigorous and youthful — smiled and waved at the crowds that had gathered along the motorcade route in Dallas to see their beloved president.

Fifty years ago, this perfect day was suddenly shattered: laughter and joy were replaced by cries of horror. The regal, slow-moving procession turned into an emergency race to the hospital. And thirty minutes later, John F. Kennedy, the beloved leader of the American people, was pronounced dead.

The suddenness of Kennedy’s death shocked Americans across the nation. The president being killed that day was the furthest thing from anyone’s mind. No one anticipated such a horrific event, and no one was prepared for it. Even with dozens of police officers and Secret Service agents on hand, no one had any idea that something like this would take place.

In the weeks, months, and years that followed, various theories about how President Kennedy was killed sprung up. No one seemed to be able to understand — much less, believe — how a book depository employee who was dissatisfied with his life could single-handedly carry-out the assassination of the president of the United States.

The point of all these explanations speak to our desire to not want to have to wrap our minds around the reality that a young, popular president who had a beautiful family and, it seemed, the world on a string could be here one moment — laughing, smiling, and waving — and gone the next, with bloody gunshot wounds to his head and his back.

Yet, this is the world we live in. People are here one day and gone the next; here one moment and gone the next. As the saying goes, “death takes no holiday.” And if death did not spare the most popular president in U.S. history, it certainly will not spare you or me.

For each of us today, it is wise to come to terms with this truth while we have a chance. As the Bible says, “Ye know not what shall be on the morrow. For what is your life? It is even a vapour, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away.” John F. Kennedy was here for a little while, and on November 22, 1963, he vanished away.

No matter if you live long into your old age and die naturally, or if, unfortunately, you pass from this life many years before your time, the best thing — the only thing — you can do about death is to prepare for it; to make certain of your destination — the place you will go to after you die.

You see, even though, our physical bodies are limited, our spirits are not. Our souls — the real part of us — live on forever. On that fateful day in 1963, John F. Kennedy — the real John F. Kennedy — simply crossed the line between this temporal physical realm and the eternal spiritual realm. In this eternal spiritual realm, Kennedy had a very important meeting to go to — he had an appointment with God.

The Bible says in Hebrews 9:27, “It is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment.” When you die, you will have to attend the very same appointment that John F. Kennedy attended. You will go to meet God. Allow me to share with you how you can be prepared for this meeting.

+ Plus, listen to Al Green singing “Nearer My God to Thee”

GLMX #142: Here One Moment and Gone the Next

This past week was certainly among the most turbulent weeks America and the world has ever experienced. It began on Monday, at the Boston Marathon, when a joyous event was turned into a scene of terror. Three people who had gathered with many others to cheer on the runners as they crossed the finish line were killed by two bombs that exploded on the sidewalk. One of those killed was a restaurant manager, another was a young Chinese college student, and the third was an eight-year-old boy who was there to cheer on his father. 183 other people were injured, many of whom had to have legs amputated because of the blast.

This past week, poisoned letters were also sent to President Obama and a U.S. Senator from Mississippi. Thankfully, these letters were intercepted before they reached their destinations.

On Tuesday, a massive earthquake struck the Iran-Pakistan border. The quake was so powerful that it was felt across the Middle East and Asia from Dubai to India. 34 people died from this earthquake.

On Wednesday evening of this past week, a fire broke out at a fertilizer company in a small town in central Texas. Volunteer firefighters rushed to the scene. While they were fighting the fire, a huge explosion occured. It was so powerful that it registered as a small earthquake. 14 people, including the firefighters, have since been confirmed dead, many people have not been accounted for, and dozens more are without homes or material belongings.

Finally, on Saturday, a 6.6 magnitude earthquake struck a region in southwestern China. At the latest report, over 200 people are dead from this quake and over 6,700 people have been injured.

Many people recognized that so much tragedy in such a short period of time seems unusual. Two CNN reporters even referred to the Boston Marathon bombing, the West, Texas explosion, and the poisoned letters sent to President Obama and a U.S. senator as being similar to biblical plagues that seemed to be hitting the country all at the same time.

The terrible loss of life that struck the world this past week is both astounding and heart breaking. All of the people who died from events that were beyond their control have one thing in common. None of them thought they were likely going to die that day. They were living their lives just like you and I are doing today. They just wanted to go to work, go to school, go to the store, and spend time with their family and friends. They wanted to enjoy a fun sporting event with other residents of their city. They wanted to spend a peaceful evening at home eating dinner or watching TV. Yet, all of them were here one moment and gone the next. In the space of a bomb blast, an earthquake, or an explosion, they each passed from life into eternity.

Such events should cause us to soberly remember that our lives are just as fragile. We are not special. We are no better than those people who died this past week. Hebrews 9:27 says that “it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment.” We, too, can be here one moment and gone the next. We can pass from life to eternity in a moment of time by some unexpected, tragic event that is totally beyond our control. Such events remind us that we need to be ready for what comes after death — our eternal destination.