Welcome to the Gospel Light Minute!

Daniel Whyte III is a full-time evangelist by calling. Through the Gospel Light Minute, his main aim is to present a short, clear, understandable presentation of the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ which saved him over 30 years ago. Throughout his ministry, he has emphasized a clear presentation of the Gospel because he believes that many pastors and churches mix up the Gospel with other things, and this causes confusion for nonbelievers. In order to do that, Daniel Whyte III uses tracts that he has written, as well as tracts produced by the following ministries: Fellowship Tract League, the American Tract Society, and Good News/Crossway Tracts in the production of this broadcast.

Chris Paul says he’s Thankful his Parents Taught him to Have Faith in God (Gospel Light Minute #195)

Chris Paul

Chris Paul


He is a professional basketball player who currently plays the point guard position for the Los Angeles Clippers of the NBA. He played college basketball at Wake Forest University. He was drafted by the New Orleans Hornets and played there from 2005 to 2011 before joining the Clippers. He won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award in 2006 and an Olympic gold medal with USA Men’s basketball team in 2008 and 2012. He also led the NBA in assists four times and steals six times from 2008 to 2015. He has also been selected to eight NBA All-Star teams, six All-NBA teams, and six All-Defensive teams. Since 2013, he has served as the National Basketball Players Association president.

He said of his faith: “I am a Christian. I grew up in the church and still go to church every Sunday if we don’t have practice. It’s always something that my parents instilled in me. I’ve grown to be pretty devout in my faith. I am so thankful that my parents raised me and my brother, C.J. to depend on God’s guidance and our faith in Him, and to always be thankful for what we receive. As I went through the past year, I just kept trying to have fun, knowing that I was playing basketball at the highest level, and remain humble, keeping in mind that all this [I have received] could be taken away from me as fast as it was happening.”

His name is Chris Paul. Continue reading

GLMX #247: Things That Last Forever

forever


We live in a world that is temporary. The events of each day remind us that we are living on borrowed time — that at any moment everything we know could come to a screeching halt. Every day, lives are cut short by illness, car accidents, and criminal activity. Each hour serves as a reminder that we ought to be grateful for every breath we take. The Bible says, life is just “a vapor that appeareth for a little while and then passeth away.”

Recent news reports out of the Middle East have revealed that the extremist militant group known as the Islamic State or ISIS has been destroying ancient artifacts and historical sites from the Assyrian and Babylonian empires. These two great kingdoms were world powers in their day, yet their cities lie in ruins, and, today, even the remains of those cities are being crushed and destroyed.

Scientists warn that people are using up Earth’s resources far too fast. They predict that, in the future, wars will be fought over access to dwindling water supplies. Coal and fossil fuels which are the source of electricity for the majority of the world’s population they also claim is running out. On top of that, many believe that climate change, spurred on by man-made pollution, is slowly transforming the Earth’s atmosphere and could one day radically transform land masses.

The one common denominator of our world and of human existence seems to be the fact that everything fades away in the end. Kingdoms fall. Buildings decay. Species become extinct. And, perhaps the most troubling aspect of all is that people die.

Despite evidence that seems to point to the contrary, death is unnatural. The cessation of a human life at any age was never meant to be. The reality is: we are eternal souls meant to live and enjoy a never-ending relationship with an eternal God. Death was not a part of the Creator’s original plan for you and me.

You may think that when you die, that will be the end of everything for you — you will simply cease to exist. But that is not the case. When your body dies, your spirit will separate from it and continue to live throughout eternity in one of two eternal locations — Heaven or Hell. Heaven and Hell are just as real as the city you live in. And your invisible soul is just as real as the physical body it is held in right now. In fact, it is your soul that is hearing me speak right now or reading these words right now, not your body.

Heaven, Hell, and your soul — these are things that never fade away.

MUSICAL SELECTION: “Amazing Grace” by Celtic Woman

A New Kingdom, Part 2 (Onward Christian Soldier #79)

Onward Christian Soldiers

Onward Christian Soldiers


Romans 6:1-2: “What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?”

In our last lesson we began talking about sin in the life of the Christian. We reviewed how we were born into Adam’s sinful race under the influence of the kingdom of darkness, and how that through the death and resurrection of Christ we were born again into the family of God and have been placed in the kingdom of light.
Continue reading

Living in the Days of Noah and Lot, Part 1 (Pilgrim’s Progress According to the Bible #35)

Pilgrim's Progress

Pilgrim’s Progress

PART A


PART B


TEXT: Luke 17:26-33

26 And as it was in the days of Noe, so shall it be also in the days of the Son of man.

Continue reading

Israel in the End Times (Part 6)

TEXT: Romans 11:8-16

In our last message in this series, we talked about how that by the Gentiles getting saved, the Jews will be ‘provoked to jealousy,’ and will desire salvation through Jesus Christ themselves. Paul also informs us that since “salvation is of the Jews” and the Gentiles benefit greatly from that salvation, when the Jews come around to accepting Christ, they will benefit all the more.

As we pick up where we left off, in verses 13 and 14, Paul says, “For I speak to you Gentiles, inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify mine office: If by any means I may provoke to emulation them which are my flesh, and might save some of them.” By calling himself the “apostle of the Gentiles,” Paul emphasizes his special calling to take the Gospel to those who are not Jews. The Greek word for “magnify” means to make glorious, to clothe in splendour, to honour, to extol, or celebrate. Paul takes pride in his calling to minister to the Gentiles, and one of the reasons why is because he knows he can “provoke to emulation” his own people — the Jews. He wants the Jews to “emulate” or imitate the Gentiles in their acceptance of Jesus Christ.

Ben Witherington and Darlene Hyatt state, “Paul honors and glories in this ministry because it is an honor to lead people to Christ, and he hopes it will even have some good effect on his Jewish kin. Paul sees his mission to Gentiles as indirectly a mission to Jews as well. Even the Apostle to the Gentiles took seriously the gospel priority of ‘to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile,’ though his focus was on Gentiles.”

In the book of Acts, we see that some of the fiercest opponents of the Gospel message, as it was spread across the Mediterranean area, were the Jews. (And we must remember that, before his conversion, Paul was one of them.) It was the Jews who stoned Stephen. It was the Jews who arrested Peter and John after they preached in the Temple and healed a lame man at the Temple gate. After that, the Jews plotted to kill several of the apostles. Paul said that he faced dangers from his own countrymen. Twice in Acts, we see Paul driven out of town by Jews after having preached the Gospel in their synagogue. Jews had Paul arrested and taken to the Roman governor Felix and to King Agrippa. Agrippa told Paul, “Jews appealed to me, both at Jerusalem and here, loudly declaring that he ought not to live any longer.”

Even though the majority of the Jews of Paul’s day had rejected the Gospel, Paul still desired for them to be saved. And that is part of the reason why he was so dedicated to spreading the Gospel among the Gentiles.

GLMX #246: Gardner C. Taylor, the Prince of Preachers, was “Surprised by Grace” After a Life-Changing Fatal Car Accident

Gardner C. Taylor

Gardner C. Taylor


Dr. Gardner C. Taylor, who passed away on Easter Sunday this year, is hailed today as the “dean of American preaching.” But, if Gardner C. Taylor had had his way, he would have never been a preacher at all. According to a Christianity Today feature story, Dr. Taylor was born in 1918 to Reverend Washington and Selina Taylor, and he inherited “Baptist genes” that many assumed would lead him into pastoral ministry. But Taylor said, “I recoiled from the thought of being a preacher. I wanted to go to law school and become a criminal lawyer. My boyhood friends in Louisiana tried to discourage me from that idea, though; at that time, no black person had ever been admitted to the Louisiana bar.” Taylor pursued his goal, and after being admitted to the University of Michigan Law School, he was well on his way to a career in law.

However, shortly before leaving home to go to college, he was involved in a tragic car accident. One night in rural Louisiana, another vehicle suddenly cut across his path. He said, “I tried to avoid them, but I couldn’t.” Both of the passengers in the other car — two white men — died. And the only witnesses to the accident were a white farmer and a white oil refinery worker.

Being a young black man, Gardner Taylor was worried about how everything would turn out. He said, “In that day, for a white person to tell the truth about a black person in that situation was incredible; but those men told the truth. I would not be here today if they had not.” That event was the turning point in his life when he finally decided to accept the call to preach. He said, “I was surprised by God’s grace. I had been brooding about my future for a long time, but that was the defining moment.”

Many have testified to the power of God’s grace in their lives. It was God’s grace that delivered a young Gardner C. Taylor from the possible deep South, Jim Crow devastating consequences of what was already a tragic situation. But more importantly, it was God’s grace that led him to salvation in Jesus Christ and to the calling to preach the Gospel which caused Him to become known as one of the greatest preachers who walked the earth. Even though he was a very humble man who said he “wanted to be remembered as just a preacher”, many call him “the prince of preachers” and “the dean of American preaching.” And it is God’s grace that can deliver you from the even greater consequences of your own sins, faults, and failures, and give you new life to be who God has made you to be and do what God has gifted you to do. Allow me to explain to you what I mean. Continue reading

Stephen Curry: ‘Basketball Gives Me the Opportunity to Point People to the Man Who Died On the Cross for Our Sins’ (Gospel Light Minute #194)

Stephen Curry

Stephen Curry

He is a professional basketball player who currently plays the point guard position for the Golden State Warriors of the NBA. He played college basketball for Davidson University where he was twice named Southern Conference Player of the Year and set the all-time scoring record for both Davidson and the Southern Conference. He also set the single-season NCAA record for three-pointers made in his Sophomore year. He was twice named an NBA All-Star and in the 2014-2015 season, exceeded his own NBA record of 272 three-pointers with his 273rd on April 9, 2015. He is a two-time gold medalist as a member of the United States men’s national basketball team in both 2010 and 2014. He is also a silver medalist with the Under-19 USA team in 2007.

In an article for the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, he said of his faith: Continue reading

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